Samsung introduces Neon, digital avatar with artificial intelligence and emotions | CES 2020

"The Neons will be our friends, our collaborators and partners, learning and evolving," said Pranav Mistry, the executive director of the Samsung lab.


Samsung Neon digital avatar with artificial intelligence and emotions.
Samsung Neon digital avatar with artificial intelligence and emotions.



Samsung Neon


On Tuesday, computer giant Samsung unveiled a digital avatar called "Neon", defined as an "artificial human" who works through artificial intelligence technologies, capable of "talking and sympathizing" like real people.

The Neon was created by Star Labs, a California-based unit of South Korean electronics giant Samsung.

"Neon is a virtual being created with a computer that looks like a real human, capable of emotion and intelligence," said Star Labs, the Samsung subsidiary, at the opening of the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas.

Unlike attendees based on artificial intelligence, the Neons are not robots infused with science or androids or human copies. They are not interfaces that are asked for weather information. Neons converse and sympathize like real humans, Star Labs claimed in its presentation.



Neon, Samsung’s AI-powered avatar.



Neons as future film actors

According to the company, they are personalized digital beings that can appear on devices or in video games and can serve as "television presenters, spokespersons or film actors," even as friends or personal companions.

"The Neons will be our friends, our collaborators and partners, continuously learning, evolving and creating memories from their interactions," said Pranav Mistry, the lab's executive director.

Labs added that Neons are inspired by "the rhythmic complexities of nature and are widely trained to know how humans appear, behave and interact.

"Each NEON has its own unique personality and can show expression, movement and dialogue," he said in his presentation.


From science fiction to reality

The company expects its virtual beings to serve as business representatives, financial advisors or personal advisors.

"We always dream of virtual beings in both science fiction and movies," Mistry said. "The Neons will integrate with our world and serve as new links to a better future, a world in which humans are human and machines are human," he said.

From 7 to 10 January, the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas will welcome some 175,000 visitors and more than 4,500 exhibitors, who will present increasingly thinner and more flexible displays, increasingly creative robots and objects more intimately connected to the human body.