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Researchers developed a way to deal with cancerous tumors that are resistant to immunotherapy

Researchers from the US and Israel found a way to deal with tumors that developed a resistance to immunotherapy
In recent years, the field of cancer treatment with immunotherapy has made headlines. Medications of this type activate the immune system and mobilize it against the cancerous growth, thus helping the body to destroy the malignant cells on its own. But many cancerous tumors manage not only to passively evade the immune system, but also to display proteins on their cell membrane that "cheat" the immune system and make it think the cell is normal.

In order to deal with them, a specific type of immunotherapy called checkpoint inhibitors has been developed, which prevents communication between the tumor and the immune system, thus preventing it from delaying its activity. These medications are not directed directly at the tumor, but rather prevent it from evading the immune system. Their use requires initial mobilization of the immune system in the cancerous environment,…

A new automated system that is capable of producing organs from stem cells

Organoids: mini organs in a petri dish for disease research and new curesA new automated system developed at the University of Washington is capable of efficiently producing mini organs from stem cells, and thereby has the potential to accelerate biomedical science and research.

Normally, when a researcher wants to test medications or treatments on cells from a particular tissue - for example, a liver - he should first grow the cells in the laboratory in a petri dish. The cells grow on the bottom of the dish and form a thin two-dimensional tissue that does not reflect what happens in the complex three-dimensional tissue that exists in the body. In recent years, researchers have been able to make stem cells develop into three-dimensional structures more like those in the body, called mini-organs. Researchers are able to test different treatments for the mini-organs, and to be more confident that they actually reflect what happens in the living body.

But there is one big problem: produci…

Findings from an archaeological site in Jordan indicate that dogs lived with humans 11,500 years ago

The transition from hunter-gatherer societies to farmers' societies
The people who lived 11,500 years ago in the area that is today northeast of Jordan apparently did not know this, but they were in the midst of one of the most important changes in human history: the transition from hunter-gatherer societies to farmers' societies. This is the change that led to the development of cities and then kingdoms, and ultimately to all human civilizations. These people already lived in permanent settlements, and began to use more and more plants and animals in their environment. And they had something else: dogs. 

In a new article, researchers from Denmark and the United Kingdom suggest that dog domestication have contributed to the expansion of resources available to people of the period, and that the dogs mainly helped to hunt relatively small prey, such as rabbits.
Those whose remains were found at a site known as Shubayqa 6 lived in basalt stone structures, with a stone floor, which …

Research, Neanderthals couldn't adapt to climate change, starved and ate human flesh

About 128,000 years ago, the world began to warm up. It was a relatively brief respite between two ice ages, and it lasted about 14,000 years. Temperatures reached about two degrees Celsius above the average in the 20th century, glaciers thawed and large parts of Europe gave way to dense forests. The Neanderthals who lived on the mainland had a hard time coping with sudden climate change. In a new study, researchers from France examined bones and other findings from a cave in the southeastern part of the country and concluded that those ancient people were unable to find enough food in the warmer climate and had to resort to cannibalism to support themselves.


The world was heating up, the mammoths were goneNumerous bones and tools were found in the soil of the Moula-Guercy cave, from various periods of Neanderthal settlement in the area. Which dates back to the period between the Ice ages, the cave contains bones and charcoal that were preserved in an excellent manner and enable the re…